Rock the Gulf Benefit at the Shuck Shack Austin

Can you think of a better place in Austin to hold a Rock the Gulf benefit than the Shuck Shack? This tasty little seafood joint is at the top of our list for summer outdoor Gulf Coast-style dining. You see, for all of ya’ll who ain’t never been down to the south too much, Gulf Coast dining spots dot the highways and cities of the Lone Star State from Orange on the Lusiana border (where Tracie P grew up) to Austin, the cradle of the west. All of these businesses, many of them locally owned liked the Shuck Shack, have been affected by the oil spill disaster.

The Shuck Shack is one of Tracie P’s accounts (and one of her favs, I may add) and she helped to rustle up donations for this exceedingly well organized (I must add) event held last night on the south side of Austin. That’s owner Katherine Fertitta and manager Bill Garcia.

Fried catfish, Texas caviar, biscuit, and corn on the cob. Uh huh…

I couldn’t resist the “Bloody Shame.” Tracie P had a “Tar Ball Lemonade” (with muddled blueberries playing the starring role).

The music (I also must say) was excellent, but, then again, that happens nightly in Austin (how do you like my Texas swagger?). Tracie P even won a donated raffle prize! How about that???!!! An Eddy Summer Sausage basket that will be greatly enjoyed this estive season Chez Parzenella!

To find out about how you can help, check out the Gulf Restoration Network.

My first (and last) gulf oyster

Above: You had me at hello… The oven-roasted gulf oysters at Cochon in New Orleans, in February 2009.

Reading The New York Times this morning as I munched my quesadilla (topped with “casera” salsa by Herdez, which, btw, you must look for in a can as opposed to jar, because it just tastes SO much better), I found myself entirely mesmerized by the “domino effect of lives touched” described in this article and I couldn’t help but remember my first gulf oyster (above), masticated in New Orleans not long after I moved to Texas, back in February 2009.

Will it be my last?

Above: Before the BP oil spill, it was common to serve endless raw gulf oysters at crawfish boils and other summer gatherings. This year, it’s not.

Gulf oysters are in short supply these days in the wake of the oil spill and subsequent catastrophe but I trust and hope they will rebound. Check out the Times article. It’s fascinating… My favorite passage:

    And yes, the captain eats oysters. Using a short knife, he pops the seal of a just-harvested oyster with safecracker élan, makes a cut, and slurps the wild goop down.

Buon weekend, ya’ll!

Posts from the Gulf coasts and dispatches on the spill

Above: Guitar legend Jimmie Vaughan is a master of the “Gulf Coast” guitar style. I snapped the above photo last year at Antone’s in Austin.

Just a quick end-of-the-day post to point your attention to a couple of Gulf Coast blogs where you can read about the local impact of the BP oil spill. The author is Ms. Ashley, who reps Kermit’s wines in the South Eastern U.S. (we met when I accompanied Kermit on his record party tour last year).

Check out her posts on the oil spill and how it’s affected gulf coast beaches and the local food and wine economy, here and here (with photos).

Thanks for reading: please don’t forget the victims of the BP oil spill!