Reactions to the Suckling & Gambero Rosso marriage

There were a lot of interesting reactions to yesterday’s news that James Suckling will join the editorial staff at Gambero Rosso. Some were… ahem, how can I say this? Mmmmm… visceral.

One of the more interesting observations came from Italy’s top wine blogger and a long-time critic of the Suckling approach to scoring, Mr. Franco Ziliani (above).

Franco pointed out, with a relative measure of irony, that:

    ‘Giacomino’ Suckling is the right man for the post-Cernilli era at Gambero Rosso.

    I also think that Mr. Cernilli (some years ago I invented a nickname for him: Robert Parker der Tufello – Tufello is a very popular area in the outskirts of Rome) could be the right man for Wine Spectator in the post-Suckling era.

    Why not? Suckling for Gambero Rosso and Cernilli for Wine Spectator and things will never change, absolute continuity in the mainstream (establishment) flow of information about Italian wines.

I also really liked what my virtual friend Andy Pasternak (above, with his wife JoAnn) had to say:

    We actually had a long discussion about this at dinner tonight and my lovely wife brought up a great point. Ten or twenty years ago, when wine drinkers had far fewer resources to learn about wine, magazines like Gambero Rosso and WS were way more important. With the advent of the interweb, and great [wine] blogs […], people have more resources to learn, read and figure out where to get wines that they like.

I think that both make excellent points.

A Sicilian prince once said: In order for everything to stay the same, everything must change.

Click here to read all the comments (warning: CONTAINS ADULT LANGUAGE).

4 thoughts on “Reactions to the Suckling & Gambero Rosso marriage

  1. The old hierarchy, while not eradicated, has been minimalized by the web. Like Ron Washam like to say, this is all so many barking poodles, both in print and in the blogs. Let everyone talk their talk about wine, whether it be Suckling or Cernilli or Franco or whomever.

    This will all sort itself out. Everything must change. And it will all be OK.

    James and Daniele probably having a good laugh, with all the free squawk they’re getting from the blogs.

  2. The REAL problem is that there still are V.I.P. buyers in the US that refused even to taste Berunellos 2005 JUST because the low scores given by J.S.
    The power of prople like J.S. or D.C. is far from being eradicated by the net. Unfortunately this is the true issue.
    After the whole fuzz of the Brunello scandal, small serious indie producers are still struggling because of that nasty backlash caused by others on the appellation, while some people that was involved is enjoing a freshly given 100 pointers that will guarantee a very nice sales flow.
    Are we ever going to learn something from this lesson?

  3. I am sure you already know that JS denied his “marriage” with Gambero Rosso….so that’s not an issue anymore.
    My point is that I completely agree with JoAnn Pasternak. With the advent of all the new wine blogs, social media and most of all…forums…, wine lovers have many more ways to get information about wines. So for sure people will keep reading famous magazines, but they’ll also look for information from their peers, who are independent and don’t get paid for what they write.
    As for many other sectors, also for the wine, marketing has become more customer-centric. So it is important to get a good score, but it is also important to know what those people who really “buy and drink” the wine, think about it.
    Hopefully, wine producers will listen to their customers and learn from what they say.

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