Last pesto in Houston as the dreadful summer of 2014 comes to an end

best pesto recipeAbove: our last pesto for the dreadful summer of 2014.

And so it’s coming to an end. The dreadful summer of 2014.

Wars in Europe and the Middle East. Ebola outbreak in Africa. Children (yes, children!!!) being shunned and scorned on our southern border by dehumanized politicians. A powder keg of racial tensions here in the U.S. News media that relish and exploit images of a decapitation as Americans sit down to dinner…

I was only eleven years and hardly world-wise in 1978 (the year my nuclear family fell apart). But I know I’m not the only one to make an analogy between the now and the late 1970s in the U.S., when the “oil crisis” arrived, the Russians and Americans were poised to annihilate each other, terror brought western Europe to a standstill, and Spielberg’s Close Encounters depicted a world in tumultu.

It seems petty to mention here the current, disastrous situation for Italian winemakers, who have experienced one of the rainiest growing cycles of our lifetimes. Their battles against hail, rot, and mildew are dwarfed by the myriad human crises that have taken shape this summer.

But they represent another thread in the fabric of the world’s ills.

And they’re not the only growers facing crisis. The decimation of Burgundy (and Barolo) vineyards by hail and the earthquake in Napa were bookends to the growing season.

As August came to a close, it seemed that the news couldn’t get any worse.

And then, here in the Houston wine and food community, the unthinkable happened when a rising star chef, charismatic and beloved by his peers, died at twenty-eight. A tragedy by any measure.

His wasn’t the only passing that punctuated our dreadful summer of 2014.

Stefano Bonilli, ousted founder of Gambero Rosso and champion of socio-politically enlightened food writing, left this earth in early August.

Indigenous grape pioneer Paolo Rapuzzi was another bright light extinguished in August 2014…

Last night, I made my girls one last pesto for the summer of 2014.

As my daughters, my wife, and I sat down to dinner, I couldn’t help but think of Boccaccio’s Lisabetta da Messina and the mournful tears that made her basil so rich in aroma and flavor.

Innocent and unaware of the problems of the world, our daughters (aged one and two-and-a-half) are healthy, happy, playful, and joyful. One day, Tracie P and I will have to tell them about the dreadful summer of 2014.

But for the time being, I’ll cherish the solace that I found in their smiles, laughter, and hugs. And I’m glad that the summer is over…

girl with a pearl earring

3 thoughts on “Last pesto in Houston as the dreadful summer of 2014 comes to an end

  1. Che bel piatto di pasta! And I can see someone took matters into her hands, so to speak. Dreadful summer, indeed. I still hope for a brighter world for your daughters, my nephew and all the children of the world.

  2. The sweetness of our girls’ laughter and hugs is all I need to get by when the world seems to be falling to pieces. We are lucky, 2B. I love you

  3. So simple and right to make 10 or 12 mason jars (or more) full of pesto, minus the cheese, and freeze. We had a plot in the Roosevelt Island Community Garden, and each year cultivated 20 basil plants. An abundance of pesto until the autumn, then I harvested each and every last leaf — but in the morning or evening only — before the first frost and made our batches of pesto, minus the cheese. A freezer full of jars worked wonders on a long winter night in New York … a bottle or two of Monte Antico, thaw the mason jar in the sink in warm water, make some malfatti, grate the cheese into the mixture. Sublime.

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