About

In 2007, food and wine historian, Italian translator, and rock musician Jeremy Parzen Ph.D. created his blog “Do Bianchi” to offer readers a humanist perspective into the world of Italian wine and food. Since its creation, he has expanded its coverage to include a wide range of food and wine experiences – from a Mexican food tour in the southwestern United States to impromptu dining and wine pairing at the bar at Le Bernardin.

Although much has been written about Italian gastronomy in this country over the last two decades, the great misunderstanding known as the Atlantic Ocean continues to dilute much of the information that makes the crossing.

Do Bianchi’s mission is to offer non-Italian speakers otherwise inaccessible insights into Italian gastronomic culture. For Italophiles and Italians, Do Bianchi provides cogent historical perspective into wines and foods whose cultural value is often taken for granted.

Named after a common Venetian expression (often overheard by the blog’s creator in the taverns of Venice, “Two White Wines”), Do Bianchi is considered a leading resource for information on Italian food and wine in this country and has been cited by some of North America’s leading food and wine bloggers, including Eric Asimov and Alice Feiring, among others.

Curriculum vitae

Born July 14, 1967, in Chicago, Illinois, and raised in La Jolla, California, Jeremy Parzen is a widely published author and translator. His feature articles on food, wine and food history have appeared in nationally distributed cooking magazines, cookery books and academic journals. He lived, traveled, worked, and studied in Italy as a graduate student and resided in New York from 1997 to 2008. He now lives in Austin, Texas, traveling frequently to La Jolla, New York, and Europe.

He has translated numerous literary works, scholarly essays and books, including The Gallery of Memory by Lina Bolzoni (UTP) and F.T. Marinetti’s The Untameables (Sun and Moon).

During the Italian Presidency of the European Union (2003), he worked as a writer, interpreter and translator for the Permanent Mission of Italy to the United Nations where he interpreted (simultaneous and consecutive) for the Italian Foreign Minister Franco Frattini and translated, edited and wrote diplomatic correspondence and speeches.

As a doctoral candidate at U.C.L.A., he was an instructor of Italian language, cinema, and literature from 1990 through 1993, and he also worked as a bibliographer in the Marinetti and Bontempelli archives for the Getty Research Institute before completing his graduate studies.

His work on Petrarchan versification and textual bibliography was first published in Italy in 1995 (Lettere italiane) and in 1997 he published a facsimile of the Aldine Petrarch in Ahmanson-Murphy Collection thanks to a grant from the Ahmanson Foundation, Los Angeles.

Awarded a Fulbright research fellowship in 1994, he spent a year at the Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa. He was also the recipient of the Dissertation Year Fellowship from U.C.L.A. (1996-97).

For two years he was the chief wine writer and Associate Editor of La Cucina Italiana (1998-2000), New York. His translation of the first modern cookery book by fifteenth-century Italian cook Maestro Martino was published in January 2005 by the University of California Press.

His articles on food and wine have appeared in Wine & Spirits Magazine, Gastronomica, Men’s Vogue, La Cucina Italiana, and The Tasting Panel among others.

On his own and as one of the songwriters of Les Sans Culottes and Nous Non Plus, Jeremy has penned songs that have appeared in motion pictures, major television advertising campaigns, and have charted on college radio.

Jeremy resides in Austin, Texas with his wife Tracie P and daughters Georgia P and Lila Jane.

46 Responses to About

  1. Uncle Jeremy,
    We enjoy your blog! xxoo

  2. [...] that follow the writings of Jeremy Parzen on his blog Do Bianchi appreciate his erudite posts, which cover a range artistic topics ranging [...]

  3. Libby Kauper says:

    ABOUT needs a photo of Signore Parzen.
    Grazie.

  4. Do Bianchi says:

    Thanks for the suggestion, Libby: added! See you soon…

  5. [...] “valley of the many wine cellars”, I tend to agree with other scholars, such as blogger Jeremy Parzen, whose research and analysis indicate that it really means “valley of alluvial deposits”. [...]

  6. Jutta Hoffritz says:

    Dear Jeremy
    I´m a German journalist, staff writer for “Die Zeit”, currently doing research on the Medicis´influence on German cuisine.
    After finding a lot of articles in the achives about how Catherina de Medici´s influenced french cooking, I guess German cuisine must have profited even more from the presence of Anna Maria Luisa de Medici who was married to the Elector Palatine Johann Wilhelm in 1691and spent the 25 years thereafter in Germany

    The couple took residence in Duesseldorf , a town with 8000 inhabitants by that time, (pavement and street lights newly introduced to impress the young bride). Art historians say Anna Maria Luisa did a lot to make Duesseldorf a place of the arts. There must have been some influence on kitchen culture too. From old bills we can see, that she had Parmesan cheese shipped over the Alps on a regular basis , I also know, she brought cooks from Florence to the Lower Rhine Area, but that´s about it. Since all Germans are fond of Italien cuisine it would be tremendously interesting for our readers to find out what we are owing Anna Maria Louisa recipewise. I know you have done research in the field of food history,.Can you help me out on this special point or -if not -can you recommend a colleague?
    Thank you so much in advance.
    Sincerely
    Jutta Hoffritz

  7. Hi Jeremy,
    I found your website accidently while researching here in France!
    My son’s name is Jeremy as well and I too am from Chicago.
    I live in Paris France and would like to collaborate with you being I write and sing my own songs.
    I am looking to collaborate with other venues.
    Please email me after viewing my website and let me know what you think.
    Keep up the great work, you seem quite interesting.
    Brigitte

    • Anne says:

      Wow I have never seen this part before. Brigitte is a good friend of mine from Paris .. and amazing singer :-) and you are from the same part of the world ..Brilliant!!

  8. [...] feet below, and can only be seen with binoculars. Michelangelo’s own face appears as that of Jeremiah — the tortured lamenter of the Old [...]

  9. I am originally from Chicago and have for years now lived in Austin.. I have been reading My Life Italian and now your blog.. My dream is to live part of the year in Italy. Maybe our paths will cross one day.

  10. Kevin Mehra says:

    Where can we send you samples to of a new wine to review?

  11. [...] usona Dobianchi,  kies aŭtoro  sin prezentas kiel historisto pri manĝaĝoj kaj trinkaĵoj,  tradukisto kaj muzikisto. Efektive ĉi-blogo [...]

  12. Sasha says:

    Howdy, Jeremy — am enjoying your blog a lot and just wanted to introduce myself: I’m a friend of Sarah Brysk Cohen’s and she told me about your work. Just launched a wine blog myself (www.spinthebottleny.com). Am particularly loving your blog as I’ve been feeling a bit too Francophilic lately and need to re-up my commitment to Italian wines. Would be great to meet up when you’re next in NYC.

  13. prairynation says:

    Jeremy, I’m so glad that you stumbled upon my blog and commented because now I have discovered your amazing blog. I plan to visit often and learn as much as I can from you! Wow, you seem to lead a fabulous life!

  14. Mark Goucher says:

    Please have a look at the wine label collages of Valentino Monticello at http://www.valentinomonticello.com they bring a different persepective to the world of wine and opera.

  15. The couple took residence in Duesseldorf , a town with 8000 inhabitants by that time, (pavement and street lights newly introduced to impress the young bride). Art historians say Anna Maria Luisa did a lot to make Duesseldorf a place of the arts. There must have been some influence on kitchen culture too. From old bills we can see, that she had Parmesan cheese shipped over the Alps on a regular basis , I also know, she brought cooks from Florence to the Lower Rhine Area, but that´s about it. Since all Germans are fond of Italien cuisine it would be tremendously interesting for our readers to find out what we are owing Anna Maria Louisa recipewise. I know you have done research in the field of food history,.Can you help me out on this special point or -if not -can you recommend a colleague?Thank you so much in advance.SincerelyJutta Hoffritz
    +1

  16. [...] the 3rd installment of What’s For Sipper?, I dive into the philological brain of one Mr. Jeremy Parzen. I first met Jeremy back in March in Asti when he so kindly invited me to join him and some other [...]

  17. Saw your post on Dammiano Meroi’s facebook. I am a Client Liaison for Small Vineyards Imports. If you are ever looking for any of the Meroi wines please let me know, thanks Daniel

  18. [...] master and project coordinator Jeremy Parzen is the author of two Italo- and eno-centric blogs, the lifestyle blog Do Bianchi and the news [...]

  19. Irwin says:

    always recommend your wine blog!
    thanx Jeremy….

  20. renaccio says:

    Buon Giorno Jeremy,
    Just found your site linked from About Italian Food.com.
    Happy to be on board. I’m an americana from Philadelphia living in Eastern Tuscany fro the last 6 years. Will be tuning into your site.
    Food, art, music, literature are my favorite subjects. Love studying regional cuisines of Italy.
    Will be tuning in frequently.

  21. [...] Bianchi – Is anyone more prolific than Jeremy Parzen? Does everyone know Jeremy? I think Jeremy knows everyone and his connections and passions for [...]

  22. Carlo Celli says:

    Jeremy;

    I was finishing the UCLA Italian program when you arrived. We met back then, made jokes about Rob Lowe. Congrats on the Brunetta translation and the funny French band names.
    Question: Why can’t I find dry Lambrusco (cheap) stateside?

  23. [...] Jeremy Parzan has the answer: his Italian Grape Name and Appellation Pronunciation Project. Parzan, who holds a [...]

  24. [...] in Tuscany at the time this was written.  Some fine work by my colleagues Alfonso Cevola and Jeremy Parzen have brought the subject of DOCG wines from the Montecucco appellation in Tuscany to light this [...]

  25. [...] Wednesday June 14, 2011 Source: The Houston Press – Eating our Words By: Jeremy Parzen [...]

  26. [...] wines. I googled around Piedmont and Alto Adige, ruminated on pinot bianco, and salivated. Since Jeremy or Alfonso weren't handy with samples, the urge to visit Lucia grew more intense than [...]

  27. [...] a Comment Tweet There is no surprise that Do Bianchi author Jeremy Parzen, whose wine and food credentials drip with immersion and cultural understanding, recently managed [...]

  28. Gina says:

    I happily landed on your blog while doing a web search for the origins of pasta puttanesca. I enjoy the sprinkle of all other things Italian as I am studying the language.

  29. [...] Jeremy Parzen reminds us of the “Magic” that is Brunello and Montalcino with his piece on Brunelli Winery.  I have never tried these wines before.. they’re now on my list.  Thanks Dobianchi! [...]

  30. [...] venerable Jeremy Parzen wrote a terrific piece yesterday in the Houston Press on the wine program at the new Uchi Japanese [...]

  31. [...] one of my favorite producers from all of Italy and wines I sold for years. The talented wine writer Jeremy Parzen is a big fan of these wines and references a great meal with their Malvasia here. Their Sauvignon [...]

  32. [...] this wonderful post - Montalcino, a Land Kissed by G-d by the very talented wine blogger, Jeremy Parzen; with links to his overview of the wines. I used to believe I went to Montalcino frequently till I [...]

  33. [...] If you’re really lucky though, you might bump into dobianchi.com‘s Jeremy Parzen. [...]

  34. [...] thoughtful and lively Jeremy Parzen, who blogs at dobianchi.com must understand this too, since he has recently undertaken to provide a video glossary of Italian [...]

  35. Hi Jeremy, I am an avid follower of your blog and have nominated you for Kreativ Blogger Award. I don’t have your email to send you the details but you can see the info in the first posting on my site if you would like to accept the nomination. I can forward to you as well if you send me a note molly at paprikapinot dot com. Thanks so much for your wonderful blog! Best, Molly (www.paprikapinot.com)

  36. noblewines says:

    Hey Jeremy saw your comment on the noblewines blog. Yeah I’m new to this blogging & micro blogging stuff, so I finally figured out how to allow comments on that post. Let me know when & if you get to NY, cause I don’t see myself in Austin very soon.

  37. [...] used to work in the wine business, he still does. So this is all wine-related, of [...]

  38. [...] 2012, Barone Pizzini and Pievalta CEO Silvano Brescianini asked American wine writer and blogger Jeremy Parzen (author of Do Bianchi) to curate a web media program for the winery group’s two [...]

  39. [...] kindred palates, and hospitality with me during the initial planning phase of this visit including Jeremy Parzen, Matteo Mollo, Ivo and Carlotta Cubi, Valentina Vason, Francesco Grigoli, Doug Cook, Rich [...]

  40. Gaia Liotta says:

    Hello, I am trying to visit Montaperti for the cultural signifigance to Dante’s work…What is the address?

  41. […] is one of the reasons I invited DoBianchi’s Jeremy Parzen to Atlanta next week.  It is one of my favorite week’s of the year, hosting an event I […]

  42. […] is one of the reasons I invited DoBianchi’s Jeremy Parzen to Atlanta next week.  It is one of my favorite week’s of the year, hosting an event I […]

  43. […] is one of the reasons I invited DoBianchi’s Jeremy Parzen to Atlanta next week.  It is one of my favorite week’s of the year, hosting an event I […]

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