Quo vadis romae? An app for the Rome-bound pilgrim.

Above: Rome is the most beautiful city in the world, imho, and it’s the greatest place in the world to drink Italian wine. I snapped this shot of the Colosseum when I was there last September.

Quo vadis romae? (Where are you going, Rome-bound pilgrim?)

It seems that nearly every week I receive a message from a romeo or romea — a Rome-bound pilgrim (pronounced roh-MEH-oh, btw), the original meaning of the proper name that Shakespeare’s play made so famous in the English language.

Yesterday, I received two (no kidding)! In both emails, the romeos asked me where to eat and drink in the Eternal City.

Above: Katie Parla is my go-to when I go to Rome. Here’s the post about our amazing dinner at Pizzeria La Fucina last year.

As much I know and love Rome (I spent six months studying the Petrarchan manuscripts at the Vatican library when I was a Fulbright fellow) and as much I know and love the wine and restaurant scene there (it is, imho, the greatest city of Italian wine), ubi major, minor cessat: my favorite expert on all things Roman, the inimitable (and aptly named) Katie Parla has released a Rome guide app for smartphones.

I highly recommend her blog and her app. She is my number-one resource for what’s cool and cutting edge in the Roman food and wine scene.

Above: Rome always takes my breath away. I snapped the above photo in September.

On this Good Friday, it seemed appropriate to post about Rome and Katie’s blog.

My best advice about visiting Rome? When a Roman cab driver takes you the long way so that he can charge you a little bit extra, he’s not ripping you off: he’s showing you around the most beautiful city on earth.

5 thoughts on “Quo vadis romae? An app for the Rome-bound pilgrim.

  1. Roma best wine town? Definitely best assortment of wine bars in a walkable zone. I’d also nominate, wait for it, Parma…high concentration of excellent enoteche in a small area. I think that’s what you mean by best wine town. If I take you literally, I’d thrown in Valdobbiadene and Montalcino too.

    • @Adrian I’m still going to go with Rome (although agreed about Montalcino and Parma and would through Serralunga in there, too!): in Rome you can drink Italian wines from EVERY region… whereas in other villages/towns/cities, selection is always more locally based and biased… non sei d’accordo?

      • Woohoo now Im even more excited about my trip to Serralunga next week! I havent been to Parma in ages so can’t really comment on that bit, but Rome really does have a spectacular selection of wines from every Italian region (though we are hard-pressed to find much from outside Italy and France). Both unpretentious enoteche and fine dining restaurants offer great variety and (generally) accessible prices. Im with you, Jeremy:)

  2. Quote: “My best advice about visiting Rome? When a Roman cab driver takes you the long way so that he can charge you a little bit extra, he’s not ripping you off: he’s showing you around the most beautiful city on earth.”

    I love it how you said this! It makes a lot of sense in a way, as taking the hybrid bus/tram or walking on food won’t give as much satisfaction! Pity I met Katie too late during my trip – to ask her advice about Rome. Lucky for you though :D

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