Another clarification on ripasso/ripassa

accordiniYesterday, I messaged the VinoWire group on Facebook, asking if anyone knew of a Valpolicella producer besides Zenato who used the term ripassa on its Valpolicella label. (Btw, if you’re not a member of the VinoWire FB group, please join!). Colleague, friend, and fellow blogger Tom Hyland weighed in with Accordini’s Ripassà (or Ripassa’ depending on whether your looking at the label or the winery’s website. Ripassa’ is a Veneto dialectal form of the Italian ripassato, literally passed again or refermented in this case. (I am reminded of Giacomo Leopardi’s famous observation that French is a language of terms while Italian is a language of paroles: like so many lemmae in the Italian lexicon, passare can assume a wide varieties of meanings depending on the context.) Thanks, Tom, for sharing the info and thanks also to Devon Broglie and Angelo Peretti who pointed out that Zenato’s “Ripassa” — without the accent grave or inverted comma — is indeed a trademarked proprietary name.

Has anyone tried the Accordini? Is it good?

In other news…

Just in the from the “unbelievable but true” department: Franco and James Suckling are in the midst of a cordial, collegial, and amiable exchange in a comment thread at James’s blog on the Wine Spectator site.

Here’s the link to the post and thread but since you have to subscribe (as I do) to view the blog, I’ve copied and pasted the exchange below.

User Name: James Suckling, Posted: 03:36 AM ET, May 28, 2009

    Guiseppe Mascarello & Figlio doesn’t send but we buy bottles normally for review. I find the wines very up and down. Some are amazing but others have flaws like volatile acidity.

User Name: Franco Ziliani, Italy Posted: 12:13 PM ET, May 29, 2009

    I know very well, and I’m a great fan, of Giuseppe (Mauro) Mascarello wines, but I confess that I don’t find any traces of “volatile acidity” that Mr. Suckling find…

User Name: James Suckling, Posted: 12:26 PM ET, May 29, 2009

    Franco. Some people have a high tolerance for VA. Have you ever been to their cellars? Anyway, it’s only been with a few wines. I generally like the wines as you do. Thanks for the comment.

User Name: Franco Ziliani, Italy Posted: 04:21 PM ET, May 29, 2009

    Mr. Suckling, apologies in advance for my poor English. I know very well the Giuseppe Mascarello cellars and I don’t think that is this kind of old, and very fresh in every season, cellar that create the problem of “volatile acidity” that you find in Giuseppe Mascarello wines. And I don’t think that a case of “high tolerance for VA” don’t allow me to find in Mascarello wines the “VA problem” that you find in few wines. Can you tell in what wines, Barolo, Barbera, Dolcetto (what vintages?) have you find VA “flaws like volatile acidity”? Thanks for your kind answer f.z.

We’ll have to wait for James’s next move!

4 thoughts on “Another clarification on ripasso/ripassa

  1. Jeremy:

    Thanks for the nice followup. I have tried the Accordini Ripassa and like it very much – his style is in between strict traditional and ultramodern. A nice wine.

    Franco – stand your ground, as I know you will!

  2. Pingback: Showdown in Tuscany? Franco and James to face-off this summer « Do Bianchi

  3. Your incites on paroles and ripassa were both enlightening. I don’t trust that anyone is debating that the ripassa process must be used in making Amarone, right?

    In other news, I just drank Luigi Righetti’s 2003 Amarone Classico and found it disappointing. Too one note, and almost no finish at all. Not worth the 23 euro that it goes for in Puglia, Italy. Thanks for the great post!

  4. I know it’s a bit late in the day, but we purchased a couple of bottles of the 1998 vintage back in 2001 in Sirmione, near Verona, just before the wedding of our best friends. We enjoyed one bottle with the father of the bride the night after the wedding, and shared the second with the bride and groom last night, 16 years later (18/04/14). The first bottle was smooth as silk, soft and delicious. The second was almost ‘port-like’, but still silky smooth and absolutely delicious! Just wish we’d bought more!

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